Portfolio

About Me

Resume

Prototyping with Axure

My Process

Designed by me. Fabricated using Axure 7 RP Pro, a super cool tool for visualizing digital products.

Employment Full Time

EnerNOC (Current)

Roundarch Isobar

Staples Advantage

EMC

Smart Destinations

Staples

Gateway

Cranmore Mountain Resort

Spaulding Composites

Nuvo Media

Mobile Consumer

Sperry New Holland (First)

Employment Freelance

Dragonwing Girlwear Athletic Clothing

Afflink Supply Chain Management

Octane Design

Mad*Pow

The Whole Body Fitness Spa

Wave Design

Marble Interiors

Inspiration

More About Me

Wired

Co.Design

Smithsonian Institute

FWA

Creative Review

The Die Line

Pipeburn

Mobile Awesomeness

TED

Behance

Core77

Society6

Linkedin

Facebook

Twitter

Flickr

My best photography

Email me

Resume

Call me at 978.846.3320

Why did I use Axure? Find out here.

While working for EMC I created visual designs for a few of their complex applications. My experience in desktop application design translates well to the web application work. Yes I have, and do, design icons.

Application Design

Mobile Designs

While at Roundarch Isobar, a global digital agency, I worked on the Comedy Central app for iOS and Android. I was the lead UX designer. The team was large, consisting of many UX designers, visual designers, and multiple office locations. We also created a mobile app, but the main focus was to make a standout tablet app. My primary responsibility was conceptual interactions, prototyping, and wireframes.

Tablet Designs

Every design I create starts as a wireframe. I have experience in many high level strategy documents such as user flows, login paths, customer journeys, page layouts, and detailed annotations. Lately I have been experimenting with interactive  prototypes that have an annotation layer to communicate complex interactions.

Wireframes

Many different digital strategies fall into the marketing experience. Some of my design experience is in acquisition and partnership communication. I have experience with creating customer journeys that communicate strategies on how to move customers through the marketing funnel.

Marketing Web Site Designs

Through out my digital career I have been involved in many website design efforts. I was part of the team that turned Staples into the second largest ecommerce company. I have also worked on a few startups and have experience in the Agile Scrum method of product developement.

E-commerce

I started my interactive design career at NECX Direct, an electronics reseller that was acquired by Gateway. My primary responsibility was designing online merchandising solutions including, vendor showcases, new product launches, and other innovative digital merchandising experiences. Then as part of the Staples Agency, I managed a large team of designers and developers responsible for over 20% of Staples online sales through its merchandising efforts.

Merchandising Designs

While at Staples I worked on many micro sites that hosted video content. On some projects I was part of the creative team that developed the video creative. Each site design supports the core video concept and extends the creative. I was also part of the technical team that developed a video hosting strategy when it became apparent that Staples.com could not provide the hosting solution.

Video Micosite Designs

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I have experience in mobile app and mobile website design. Today's digital world requires deep understanding of adaptive and responsive design strategies. I designed the first mobile app for EMC and for Staples Advantage. Currently for EnerNOC, I am working on a desktop app that uses an adaptive strategy. Regarding the mobile first, adaptive, responsive debate, my belief is User First.

Portfolio

About Me

Resume

Designed by me.

Fabricated using Axure 7 RP Pro.

Email me

Call me

Designed by me.

Fabricated using Axure 7 RP Pro.

Email me

Call me

Portfolio

About Me

Resume

Trying to create enterprise energy management solutions on desktop is complex. But what about a smart watch? As a use case, there is a compelling reason why a user would want an option to manage a building's peak demand on a watch. I had an idea and formed a small team to build a proof of concept. Check out the results.

Smart Watch Project

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EnerNOC's enterprise energy management solutions on desktop is complex. But what about a smart watch? As a use case, there is a compelling reason why a user would want an option to manage a building's peak demand on a watch. I had an idea and formed a small team to build a proof of concept.

Smart Watch Project

Application Designs

EMC Media Workspace

EMC Documentum

EMC xCP Business Process Application

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Smart Watch Project

The concept of energy management on a smart watch might sound like a wild idea considering the current complexity in enterprise energy management software. During an 8 week discovery and design session to re think our user experience for our software product, we discovered the new UI design could easily fit on the face of a smart watch. I took an early design mockup and photoshopped it onto a smart watch. The visual offered an aha! moment with the design team. Could we actually design a flexible multi device energy management application? 

Our first attempt at a smart watch proof of concept came about during a company sponsored hack-a-thon. We choose the Samsung Gear S smart watch, a fully functional "smart phone" that is worn on a wrist. The Gear S does not need to be tethered to a smart phone and can run stand alone applications.

 

The user experience design of our smart watch application is simple. It has to be because of the small screen size of the watch. Show consumption right now (the moment when the user looks at the watch), for a building, compared against a previous time period at the same time of day for the same building, and tell the user if the consumption is going up or down. Also show a graphic visualization of the trending energy consumption during a 24 hour period so the user can visualize the daily consumption pattern against the previous time period.

 

Our efforts actually produced a great looking design that worked, using the energy data from our corporate office and two other satellite offices. The kWh of the building at the time the user is viewing the watch is yellow and also represented as yellow bars in the graph. The comparison period kWh is gray and also represented as gray bars in the graph, however because the past time period is known it is fully displayed and provides the backdrop for comparison against today’s readings.

 

For the presentation I built an Axure prototype that shows the watch in different verticals.

EnergySmart is EnerNOC’s huge user conference. The company hosts this event every year. Its a time to show off our latest technology innovations and talk to customers about their energy needs. We wanted to demonstrate the watch with actual customer data, in the urban wilds of Philadelphia, outside the confines of our corporate office building and network.

 

Our team had to get a customer's production consumption data for four buildings, located in California, to a secure location for the watch to read outside of our firewall, which we did not have to do in the original hack-a-thon concept. Once the data was flowing into the database our next problem was to take the building’s meter data that is time stamped in UTM (Universal Transverse Macerator coordinate system) and adjust it to the California Pacific Standard Time zone. Depending on the time of day the user was viewing the watch, the comparison benchmark time was actually in another day. We had to run a calculation to adjust for the time difference so our data reading would align in the chart for the 24 hour period.

 

We also wanted a background animation to visually indicate if consumption was increasing or decreasing so a directional pattern was developed. To prevent a conflicting visual when the user was changing to the next building, the UI developer put a stop motion feature on press and drag, then a resume animation on release, once the building was fully viewable in the watch face.

The Concept

The Proof of Concept

Into the Wilds of Philadelphia at EnerNOC's EnergySmart Conference

Reviews at the conference were impressive and favorable. The most important takeaway is the watch has a specific use case. People associate a wrist watch to its primary function which is to tell the user the time in relationship to the day with just a quick glance at the wrist. The user “gesture” for a smart watch is a glance. The UI design must be bite size, so at a glance the user gets the correct information and then can decide how to take action. The design/dev effort is more complex because it means taking very data heavy time based information and boiling it down to just what the user needs at a given time. As far as energy management adoption on these devices, only time will tell.

 

Here is the watch reading building data from an address in California while the user is looking at the watch in Philadelphia. The consumption is trending down as shown by the background arrow.

 

Mobile Designs

EMC xCP Mobile Web App

Staples Advantage Scan to Order Mobile App

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Staples Advantage Marketing Mobile Web Site

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Tablet Designs

First Pitch

Second Pitch

Wireframes

Staples Advantage Ordering Site

Staples Advantage Mobile App

Staples Advantage Login Flow

EnerNOC User Management Flow

Marketing Web Site Designs

Staples Advantage Customer Microsite

OverRide for Mad*Pow

Thrive Networks

Web Site Designs

Smart Destinations

MOTIF by Staples

VentureOn

Merchandising Designs

Staples Advantage

Perfect Ticket

Staples

Video Microsite Designs

Staples